Scandal Moments

Scroll to Info & Navigation

#Scandal Holiday Serenade

Chris Van Dusen - A holiday serenade from the cast = AMAZING!!

Shonda Rhimes  - The cast took us to dinner last night. And sang us songs. And made merry. These are truly good peeps, Gladiators!

raye1447:

Interview with Capital File Magazine 
Bellamy Young almost wasn’t a regular on Scandal.
“In the pilot, I had two lines,” she reveals from her home in Pasadena, California. Fresh from a hair appointment and wearing a black T-shirt and flowery pants, she remembers how she was one of five actresses to audition for the bit part: “Initially, they thought maybe I’d have a three-episode arc.”
That “arc” turned into a key role on the political thriller. Today, Young expertly plays Mellie Grant, the ambitious and scheming first lady of Shonda Rhimes’s United States of America. She’s so convincing, in fact, that audiences may be surprised to know she’s actually approachable and kind.
Born Amy Young, she grew up performing in dance recitals and singing in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina, before leaving to study English and theater at Yale, with a semester at Oxford University. After graduating, she embarked on national theater tours before transitioning to television. She appeared on shows like Scrubs and Rhimes’s Grey’s Anatomy until that supposedly low-stakes audition for Scandal changed everything.
“We could never have expected the love that we’re getting,” she says now of her costars, who include Tony Goldwyn, her one time director for TV’s Dirty Sexy Money, and George Washington University alumna Kerry Washington.
Though Young has become a star since Scandal’s start in 2012, she’s remained dedicated to her craft—still working with her acting coach and studying up on past first ladies. (She doesn’t have a favorite—“way too hard to pick,” she insists—but she admires Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton for their “marriages of style and substance.”)
Does she see her fractured character as a villain? Mellie is cunning and vindictive, yet understandably hurt that her husband (Goldwyn), the president of the United States, is in love with high-stakes fixer Olivia Pope (Washington). And when viewers send as many as 2,200 tweets per minute during airings, many voice approval for Pope.
“[Shonda Rhimes] writes complicated people, so we’re all gray,” Young says. “[Mellie] definitely gets a nice tirade frequently, which I love to lean into, but there’s always heart and pain and humanity underneath it.” Young can even relate to her character, who is often seen wearing pearls and a pretend smile. “I overthink things and I’m doggedly loyal,” she admits goodnaturedly, but “I’m nowhere near as volatile.”
After traveling to Israel this summer, she is now planning to work on an album. She sings “every day, all the time,” and calls music “everything.” Going forward, she’ll continue working with her Scandal family, shooting DC scenes on a Los Angeles green screen and ruminating on the real Washington.
With season three set to premiere on October 3, Young says she is blessed to appear on Scandal, which shocks viewers and cast members alike. “We throw scripts and laugh and gasp and scream,” she says of the cast’s thrilling table reads. “I’m lucky to have a job at all, but this job is beyond my wildest dreams.”
Read more at http://capitolfile-magazine.com/personalities/articles/scandal-first-lady-bellamy-young#2yJ8sBIu7qbTutZD.99

raye1447:

Interview with Capital File Magazine 

Bellamy Young almost wasn’t a regular on Scandal.

“In the pilot, I had two lines,” she reveals from her home in Pasadena, California. Fresh from a hair appointment and wearing a black T-shirt and flowery pants, she remembers how she was one of five actresses to audition for the bit part: “Initially, they thought maybe I’d have a three-episode arc.”

That “arc” turned into a key role on the political thriller. Today, Young expertly plays Mellie Grant, the ambitious and scheming first lady of Shonda Rhimes’s United States of America. She’s so convincing, in fact, that audiences may be surprised to know she’s actually approachable and kind.

Born Amy Young, she grew up performing in dance recitals and singing in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina, before leaving to study English and theater at Yale, with a semester at Oxford University. After graduating, she embarked on national theater tours before transitioning to television. She appeared on shows like Scrubs and Rhimes’s Grey’s Anatomy until that supposedly low-stakes audition for Scandal changed everything.

“We could never have expected the love that we’re getting,” she says now of her costars, who include Tony Goldwyn, her one time director for TV’s Dirty Sexy Money, and George Washington University alumna Kerry Washington.

Though Young has become a star since Scandal’s start in 2012, she’s remained dedicated to her craft—still working with her acting coach and studying up on past first ladies. (She doesn’t have a favorite—“way too hard to pick,” she insists—but she admires Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton for their “marriages of style and substance.”)

Does she see her fractured character as a villain? Mellie is cunning and vindictive, yet understandably hurt that her husband (Goldwyn), the president of the United States, is in love with high-stakes fixer Olivia Pope (Washington). And when viewers send as many as 2,200 tweets per minute during airings, many voice approval for Pope.

“[Shonda Rhimes] writes complicated people, so we’re all gray,” Young says. “[Mellie] definitely gets a nice tirade frequently, which I love to lean into, but there’s always heart and pain and humanity underneath it.” Young can even relate to her character, who is often seen wearing pearls and a pretend smile. “I overthink things and I’m doggedly loyal,” she admits goodnaturedly, but “I’m nowhere near as volatile.”

After traveling to Israel this summer, she is now planning to work on an album. She sings “every day, all the time,” and calls music “everything.” Going forward, she’ll continue working with her Scandal family, shooting DC scenes on a Los Angeles green screen and ruminating on the real Washington.

With season three set to premiere on October 3, Young says she is blessed to appear on Scandal, which shocks viewers and cast members alike. “We throw scripts and laugh and gasp and scream,” she says of the cast’s thrilling table reads. “I’m lucky to have a job at all, but this job is beyond my wildest dreams.”

Read more at http://capitolfile-magazine.com/personalities/articles/scandal-first-lady-bellamy-young#2yJ8sBIu7qbTutZD.99

raye1447:

Ciao, Bellamy!

Bellamy Young broke out last season as the lovely yet calculating First Lady on the hit showScandal. Here, she stars as another woman who knows how to get what she wants: The Graduate's Mrs. Robinson

STORY BY // Jeff Weiss 
PHOTOGRAPHS BY // Angela Marklew

 …….

This immediately raises the question: Why has she invariably been cast as the aloof and icy type?

“There’s a theme of snootiness in my roles. I think it has something to do with my nose,” Young says, laughing. But the slight upturn in her nose actually makes the 43-year old brunette seem more aristocratic than snobby. Sitting in Heirloom, she’s wearing little makeup and dressed in a casually stylish way: a scoop-neck button-up Burgundy blouse, jeans and snakeskin sandals. Her only jewelry is a bronze bangle on her right wrist. “As an actor, you only have your face and the writing to work with. You have to meet the two,” she says.

This explains why her first professional role was what she describes as “the snooty sister” in a touring Broadway production of Meet Me in St. Louis. It’s also why Scandal‘s producers felt certain that Young would be the ideal embodiment of Mellie Grant, with her elegant Michael Kors dresses and well-hidden broken heart.

“When you meet her, you’re struck by her warmth, energy and presence,” says Scandal executive producer Betsy Beers of Young. “She radiates a calm focus and confidence that is captivating to watch.”

Young had appeared on a two-part episode of Grey’s AnatomyScandal showrunner Shonda Rimes’s first ABC smash, which Beers also executive produced. Young’s performance was impressive enough that casting director Linda Lowy called her back a half-decade later, during pilot auditions for the new show.

“The moment we saw her, there was no question she was the First Lady,” Beers added. “She brings the perfect combination of sugar and steel. She’s fun to watch, but also brings a deep vulnerability to the part.”

For all the pathos Young eventually brought to the role, Mellie Grant was originally supposed to only appear on a few episodes. But like a string of surprise breakout stars including Aaron Paul on Breaking Bad, Young resonated enough to become a full-time character last fall, at the start of the second season.

“Finding out I was a regular cast member was the best work day of my life,” Young says, taking a bite into a veggie burger, still pleased at the memory a year later. “I’ve worked so much and that was really the first time I got to be the bride and not the bridesmaid.”

You could trawl IMDB all day searching for another Hollywood actress who first broke through at age 42. There are very few. It took Young 20 years to become an overnight success, and it’s perhaps as much as anything a sign of a rare kind of patience and faith. “Everyone thinks about quitting. Acting is a pretty hard life, but it’s so wonderful when you’re doing it,” Young says. “You get to be other people. You get to act in ways that you’d never act in real life.”

Young takes a well-timed pause and adds for emphasis: “I mean, never.”

Acting is also the only career she’s known. Raised in Asheville, North Carolina by adoptive parents, Young immediately gravitated to the stage. Big-time opportunities were scarce in the Appalachian Mountains during the 1970s, so her first performances were singing in church and beauty pageants, or tap dancing at mountain youth jamborees. When she began her freshman year at Yale University, shortly after her father died, it was with dreams of being the next Albert Einstein. By the end of her freshman year, she’d switched to being an English and theater major.

“Somewhere in an alternate dimension, I’m a theoretical physicist,” Young says. “But I wasn’t cut out to be one on the national stage. I realized pretty early on that I couldn’t speak fluently in math.”

Other gifts were readily evident. Her mother was an English teacher and instilled an early love of literature in Young, whose favorite writer is T.S. Eliot. During her senior year at Yale, a touring production of Meet Me in St. Louis tapped her to play Rose. After the tour ended, she moved to Manhattan. Save for a one-week temp job at a Japanese business firm in midtown Manhattan, Young has been gainfully employed as an actress ever since.

There were major parts in Broadway musicals The Life and Stephen Sondheim’s Merrily We Roll Along. She had a lead role in the La Jolla Playhouse production of Randy Newman’s Faust. Her mother was so proud she saw it 17 times, often just to hear people talking about it in the lobby.

……..

But if anyone could stay spirited throughout such uncertainty, it would be Young. While she’s only just now reaching national notoriety, she’s worked consistently throughout her career. Anyone familiar with the vicissitudes of Hollywood understands that this is a notable feat in its own right-and one that allowed her to purchase the home in South Pasadena that she still lives in today.

……….

“Success early can be disorienting,” Young reflects. “You don’t know how to pace yourself or be humble, or take care of yourself, because you don’t know that it’s just a moment you’re in. You take it seriously, as though that’s just the way things are,” she adds, trailing off for a second, as if to momentarily re-calculate the highs and lows of the last two decades. “All I know is that this is the moment I’m in, and I’m loving every second of it.”

Read the Full Interview here